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best state to grow marijuana

Best state to grow marijuana

Average annual sunshine: 58%
Average annual precipitation: 43.8 inches
Average annual high temperature: 59 degrees
Population density per square mile: 2,232
Medical marijuana legal: Yes
Recreational marijuana legal: No
Number of people in state per 1,000 seized marijuana plants grown outdoors: 2,165.2

Average annual sunshine: 55%
Average annual precipitation: 42.4 inches
Average annual high temperature: 63 degrees
Population density per square mile: 2,108
Medical marijuana legal: No
Recreational marijuana legal: No
Number of people in state per 1,000 seized marijuana plants grown outdoors: 124

As for growing medical marijuana, it’s permitted in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington, according to Armentano.

Average annual sunshine: 60%
Average annual precipitation: 49.7 inches
Average annual high temperature: 72 degrees
Population density per square mile: 1,707
Medical marijuana legal: No
Recreational marijuana legal: No
Number of people in state per 1,000 seized marijuana plants grown outdoors: 212

9. Charlotte, NC

Using 2015 data from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, we calculated the number of people per outdoor marijuana plant seized in each state. While it may seem counterintuitive, a higher number is better for this factor, as it indicates favorable growing conditions for marijuana.

Average annual sunshine: 78%
Average annual precipitation: 34.3 inches
Average annual high temperature: 74 degrees
Population density per square mile: 3,660
Medical marijuana legal: Yes
Recreational marijuana legal: No
Number of people in state per 1,000 seized marijuana plants grown outdoors: 16.3

Average annual sunshine: 62%
Average annual precipitation: 42 inches
Average annual high temperature: 71 degrees
Population density per square mile: 1,685
Medical marijuana legal: No
Recreational marijuana legal: No
Number of people in state per 1,000 seized marijuana plants grown outdoors: 4,087.4

11. Indianapolis, IN

With Sacramento at the front of the pack, here’s our ranking of the 12 Best Cities for Growing Marijuana Outdoors.

Given the rising national interest in pot and our obsession here at LawnStarter with plants of all kinds — including the weeds that invade our lawns — we thought it would be cool to pinpoint where the best places are to grow weed (the kind you smoke) outdoors.

5. Massachusetts

Warm weather is the ideal place to grow marijuana, so Nevada definitely fits the bill. Indica strains especially are used to growing in warm, dry environments, so they’d be perfect for the desert of Nevada. And it’s also legal, so you’re in the clear.

Massachusetts was the first state east of the Mississippi river to legalize recreational marijuana, and it’s also a great place to grow cannabis. It doesn’t get too hot, and it also doesn’t get too much rain. The winters are pretty cold, so you won’t be able to grow year-round like other places, but the rest of the year is perfect.

1. California

2. Nevada

To be honest, most of the Midwest would be a good place to grow marijuana. That’s why all of our corn and soybeans and other important crops are grown there. The only issue is marijuana is not quite as rain-friendly as those crops, so you may need to monitor your water levels a little more closely. Michigan is the only state in the region though that allows people to grow their own cannabis, as long as you’re a registered medical patient. Although that may change if they legalize recreational marijuana this November.

Washington is basically the same climate as Oregon, so it’s also a great place to grow marijuana. However Washington is known for getting a lot of rain, which isn’t 100 percent ideal for marijuana plants. so you’ll need to find a way to prevent it from getting too much.

California already produces the most marijuana in the United States, so it’s no surprise it’s a good place to grow cannabis. It’s warm and sunny the entire year, so you don’t have to worry too much about fluctuating temperatures. And obviously it’s 100 percent legal to do so, so you don’t have to worry about getting in trouble.

Whether you like to take a tiny toke now and then or have been thinking about getting into the burgeoning cannabis industry for fun and profit, you may have wondered what states is it legal to grow marijuana in?

The simple answer: it’s complicated. But DripWorks is here to clarify matters as much as we can with our rundown of states where you can grow marijuana.

Many states that permit possessing only medical marijuana also let individuals grow their own. Arizona, Florida and New Hampshire are just a few examples.

Where It’s Legal to Grow Cannabis

In addition to these fully legal states, another 18 states have legalized marijuana for medical use but not for recreational purposes. These include some places that might surprise you. Traditionally conservative states like Utah, North Dakota and Arizona belong to this group, as do Southern states like Florida and Louisiana.

In all, 12 states and Washington, D.C., have fully legalized marijuana for medical and recreational use. These include Alaska, California and Colorado as well as Oregon, Vermont and Washington. Illinois recently joined this growing group, which also includes Michigan, Nevada and the New England states of Maine and Massachusetts.

Many of these states also allow commercial cultivation of cannabis. Commercial growers are highly regulated and subject to state taxes. Each has its own set of laws and regulations.

Medical Use Only States

Another cold state on the other side of the continent, Vermont, takes the prize for the fewest legal pot plants, however. If you live there, you are permitted to grow just two “mature” plants, although four “immature” plants are permitted.

As you probably know, there has been a growing trend to legalizing cannabis in recent years. Ever since California became the first state to legalize marijuana for medical use in 1996, other states have been lining up to follow in that progressive state’s footsteps.