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bishop weed seeds in hindi

Bishop weed seeds in hindi

Trachyspermum ammi (L.) Sprague is the scientific botanical name of the plant. In common languages of India as in Hindi it is called as Ajwain; in Bengali it it is called as Jowan or Joan; in Gujarati it is called as Yavan; in Kannada it is called as Oma; in Kashmiri it is called as Jawind; in Malayalam it is called as Omum; in Marathi it is called as Onva; in Oriya it is called as Juani; in Punjabi it is called as Ajamoda, Avanika; in Sanskrit it is called as Ajamoda, Avanika; in Tamil it is called as Omum; in Telugu it is called as Vamu; in Urdu it is called as Ajowain.

The Bishop’s weed has a wide range of medicinal uses that may be as follows:

The juvenile leaves are characteristically harvested in the spring season and is eaten as salads or, when picked later in the same season, it is cooked like with our favorite green vegetables. The blooms and the small fruits can also be eaten because all mentioned parts are packed with a healthy grouping of vitamins, minerals and protein.The plant is mainly rich in potassium, calcium, zinc, and vitamin A and vitamin C. Bishop’s weed has a preference of wet and shady places. It has a tendency to broaden through its extensive rhizomes, hence it is typically found in colonies of different sizes. One of its familiar German name is Geißfuß or goat’s foot, which seems to precisely describe the exceptional shape of the leaves. Ajwain instigated in the Middle East, maybe in Egypt and the Indian Subcontinent, but also in Egypt, Iran and Afghanistan. In India, the chief Ajwain producing states are Rajasthan and Gujarat, where Rajasthan harvests about 90% of India’s total manufacture.

Bishop weed seeds in hindi

It is traditionally used as a digestive aid, relieves abdominal discomfort due to indigestion and antiseptic. In southern parts of India dry ajwain seeds are powdered and soaked in milk, which is then filtered and fed to babies. Many assume that it relieves colic in babies and for kids it also improves digestion and appetite. Ajwain can be used as digestive mixture in large animals. In the northern part of India, Ajwain is often consumed after a heavy meal. It is commonly offered after dinner parties.

Hindi : Ajwain Bengali : Jowan or Joan Gujarati : Yavan Kannada : Oma Kashmiri : Jawind Malayalam : Omum Marathi : Onva Oriya : Juani Punjabi : Ajamoda, Avanika Sanskrit : Ajamoda, Avanika Tamil : Omum Telugu : Vamu Urdu : Ajowain

Ajwain originated in the Middle East, possibly in Egypt and the Indian Subcontinent, but also in Iran, Egypt and Afghanistan. In India, the major Ajwain producing states are Rajasthan and Gujarat, where Rajasthan produces about 90% of India's total production.

Indian Name of Spices

An erect, glabrous or minutely pubescent, branched annual. The stems are striate; the leaves are rather distant, 2-3-pinnately divided, the segments linear. The flowers occur in terminal or seemingly-lateral pedunculate, compound umbels, white and small; the fruits are ovoid, muricate, aromatic cremocarps, greyish brown; the mericarps, which are the components of the fruit, are compressed, with distinct ridges and tubercular surface, 1-seeded.

Latin : Trachy Spermum Ammi Persian : Zinian, Nankhwah Arabic : Kamme Muluki

Origin and Distribution