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echo head seeds

Echo head seeds

Rather than letting your carved creation head to landfill, you can encourage your plants to grow by composting the veg.

Composting

Sometimes the farm where you purchased them will take them back off you at the end of the season so it may be worth asking them when making the initial purchase.

Donate them

From soups to pies a pumpkin will help to make all kinds of hearty meals.

Echo head seeds

There are only around 1,000 parrots remaining on Bonaire. Populations exist on the Venezuelan coast as well as on the country’s islands of La Banquilla and Margarita. Historically, the parrots also lived on the island of Aruba but they became extinct there in the 1940s. Bonaire is home to the only surviving native population outside of Venezuela.

Distribution

The lifespan of wild Yellow-shouldered Amazons is not known, but we estimate it to be approximately 40 years on Bonaire. The Yellow-shouldered Amazon lives in the dry forest. Pairs nest in cavities found in trees or in the cliffs that are dotted around the island. They like perching on top of the spiny cacti that are common on the island. They feed on leaves, seeds, fruit from a wide variety of trees, and farmed crops. One of their favourite fruits is the hard-shelled, green calabash, a small gourd that they dislodge from trees with their sharp beaks. The hard shell of the calabash often cracks when it hits the ground, revealing the messy, seeded flesh on the inside.

Appearance

Bonaire’s Yellow-shouldered Amazon parrot population is under threat from poaching as well as habitat loss and degradation. Poachers take chicks from their nests to sell into the illegal local and international pet parrot trade, sometimes permanently damaging nests in the process. Bonaire has never recovered from the historic felling of its trees (most of which took place in the early 1800s). Although much of Bonaire is forested, invasive goats and donkeys damage or destroy the trees that do survive, reducing the biodiversity of plant and tree species. In addition to these pressures, the parrots’ habitat is under continual threat from commercial and residential development.