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granny smith seeds

Granny smith seeds

Cannot ship via USPS.

M-7 rootstock dwarfs to 65% of standard. Induces early and heavy bearing. Resistant to fireblight, powdery mildew, moderately resistant to collar rot. Good anchorage. Very winter hardy, widely adapted. Disadvantage: prone to suckering (prune or break off at least once per year). Trees may be held to any desired height by summer pruning.

What We Cannot Guarantee
We cannot guarantee that your tree/plant remains alive & healthy, or bears fruit, as there are too many variables beyond our control in order to do so (i.e. soil preparation, planting, fertilization, weed & pest control, adequate irrigation and/or drainage, chill hours, compatible hardiness for your zone, proper choice of pollinator, etc).

Planting & Growing Guide

Please Note: Although most of our bare-root trees arrive to our warehouse in mid-December, there are a few varieties that will not arrive until mid-January. If you order any of those varieties along with varieties that arrive in mid-December, your order will be delayed for shipment until mid-January. If you’d like us to split your shipments, please contact us at (888) 784-1722 or [email protected] Additional shipping charges will apply.

M-111 is an excellent all-around rootstock for apples. Tolerates wet, dry or poor soil. Resists woolly apple aphids and collar rot. Induces bearing at young age. Unpruned tree height 80-90% of standard, or about 15-25 ft. Trees on M-111 may be held to any desired height by summer pruning.

Characteristics

Apples are generally late blooming. Need full sun, well-drained soil, and moderate fertility. Thin fruit to maximize quality and size. Susceptible to codling moth, apple scab, powdery mildew, and gophers. Generally self-fertile, which means that the variety is pollinated by itself, and is a great pollenizer for different varieties of the same fruit. Harvest 4-5th year. Suggested spacing is 20 feet apart.

Shipping Weight: 5.0 lb

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This article was co-authored by Andrew Carberry, MPH. Andrew Carberry has been working in food systems since 2008. He has a Masters in Public Health Nutrition and Public Health Planning and Administration from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

There are 11 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

You can grow apples from seed, but keep in mind that the type of apple tree you end up with might not be the same as the seed you planted. [1] X Research source For example, if you plant a Granny Smith apple seed, you might not end up with a Granny Smith apple tree. It might be some other type of apple from the Granny Smith lineage. If you want to plant an apple tree from seed, there are several things you will need to do to increase your chances of success.