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gravenstein tangerine seeds

Gravenstein tangerine seeds

Dancy tangerines are an excellent source of vitamin C, folate, and potassium. They also contain high amounts of vitamin A, beta-carotene and antioxidant-rich flavonoids.

Dancy tangerines are available in the late fall through the winter months.

Nutritional Value

Dancy tangerines were introduced in 1867 by Colonel G. L. Dancy of Orange Mills, Florida. The Colonel received the seed from N.H. Moragne, whose tree was brought to Florida from Tangier, Morocco sometime prior to 1843. Originally referred to as a “tangierine” to mean “of or from Tangiers”, it was later simplified to ‘tangerine’. Commercial propagation of Dancy tangerines began around 1890, and by the turn of the 20th century, they were the leading mandarin variety in Florida. They were the first variety of mandarin citrus to be commercially processed into tangerine juice. The popularity of this variety began to wane after the 1970s, with the introduction of new hybrid fruits that were seedless and sweeter. Dancy tangerines fell out of favor with commercial growers and producers due to other more productive, hardier varieties and in 2012, there were no Dancy tangerines available in the marketplace. Since then, thanks to small farms and niche growers, the Dancy tangerine can be spotted at farmer’s markets and through specialty stores.

Dancy tangerines are small and have a round, flattened shape, measuring 5 to 6 centimeters in diameter. Some fruits will be slightly pear-shaped due to the presence of a small neck at the stem end. The smooth rind is a glossy, deep orange to red-orange color, and has a leathery texture. It is thin and easy to peel. Dancy tangerines have dark orange flesh that contains anywhere from 6 to 20 seeds. They have a sweet and tart flavor, with hints of spice.

Current Facts

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Gravenstein tangerine seeds

The earliest documentation of Gravenstein apples being grown is in South Jutland, Denmark in 1669. The apple made its way to the United States in 1790 by way of German migrants and Russian fur traders. The first Gravenstein orchards were planted in the early 1800’s in California at Fort Ross. Gravenstein apples were a major crop in Sonoma County, California in the early to mid 1900’s where they were sold not only for fresh use but also as a processing apple for juice, sauce, vinegar and brandy. The late 1900’s brought about a transition in the industry and much of the land previously used for apple production is now used for wine grape production. Today Gravenstein apples are grown in California, Oregon, Washington State and overseas in northern Europe.

Produce Sharing allows you to share your produce discoveries with your neighbors and the world! Is your market carrying green dragon apples? Is a chef doing things with shaved fennel that are out of this world? Pinpoint your location annonymously through the Specialty Produce App and let others know about unique flavors that are around them.

Gravenstein apples are renowned for their exceptional sweet tart flavor that shines in both cooked and raw preparations. Pair with chicken, pork, onion, mushrooms and robust cheeses in savory preparations or pear, vanilla, cinnamon and chocolate in sweet preparations. When cooked the flavor of the Gravenstein apple is enhanced and the flesh will hold its shape. They can be baked, sautéed, roasted or slow cooked and pureed. A popular dessert apple Gravenstein makes an excellent addition to pies, tarts, cakes and cookies.

Gravenstein apples are available mid to late summer.

Geography/History

Gravenstein apples have green to yellow undertones and are covered in dense red and orange striping. Its crisp flesh is creamy white and rich with juice. Highly aromatic the Gravenstein apple offers a classic sweet-tart apple flavor with nuances of honey.

Gravenstein apples are a member of the rose family (Rosaceae) and of the species malus domestica. Though touted by many as one of the best tasting baking apples on the market the Gravenstein has had some set backs preventing it from becoming a successful commercial variety. It has a short and early harvest season, does not ship well and has a shorter shelf life compared to most apples. Gravenstein trees also have delicate stems which results in the fruit being prone to pre harvest drop.

Gravenstein apples are low in calories, cholesterol free and rich in soluble fiber, which has been shown to promote a healthy cardiovascular system. They also contain a fair amount of potassium and vitamin C as well as some iron, vitamin A and boron, most of which is found in the skin.

Recipe Ideas

Near Redmond , Washington, United States
About 520 days ago, 8/08/20