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homemade nutrients for growing weed

When applied to soil, you’re adding to the soil food web by introducing a healthy population of microorganisms that are aerobic in nature. These organisms hold nutrients, aerate soil, aid water retention, increase nutrient absorption in the cannabis plant, help grow healthy roots, and help prevent diseases.

When using liquid nutrients for cannabis plants, it’s important to have a watering schedule to write down and track:

Your marijuana plants need the following primary nutrients, collectively known as macronutrients:

Calcium is responsible for keeping the structure of cell walls in a plant together. Without calcium, new growth won’t develop properly and the plant won’t function as it should. New growth will be stunted, leaves will curl, and rusty spots will show up on the plant.

Build a compost tea brewer

Some growers also find that growing organically increases the flavor profile of finished cannabis as well as increases yields.

Compost tea should never be a 100% replacement for nutrients, but it can be a great complement to other nutrients.

To use liquid nutrients, you’ll need a separate water tank, such as a dedicated garbage bin, to mix them into water. You’ll also need to know how much water is needed for all your plants. Depending on the amount of water you need, add the correct ratio of liquid nutrients according to the bottle’s directions.

Check your pH

You can add compost tea to weed plants by:

Nitrogen is also part of amino acids that act as building blocks for proteins in a plant. Without the necessary proteins, your cannabis plants will be weak and frail. Nitrogen is also a part of ATP, which allows plant cells to control the use of energy.

Homemade nutrients for growing weed

If you don’t brew your own coffee, opting to buy from your local coffee store, then that’s where to get used coffee grounds – for free! That’s because, it costs coffee houses more to get rid of used coffee grounds because if it’s not getting used, it goes to landfill.

1 – Coffee Grounds

From there, it emits methane – “a greenhouse gas more harmful than carbon dioxide.” Source: (and further reading: https://blog.epa.gov/2009/02/24/climate-for-action).

2 – Grass Clippings

Let the grass clippings soak for a few days. What will happen is the chemicals from the grass clippings will release into the water. You can then use that water to feed your plants, then add the grass clippings to your compost pile. A 2-for-1 on what would otherwise be wasted.