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how to grow a single marijuana plant indoors

How to grow a single marijuana plant indoors

Indoor growing requires creating artificial environments that are conducive to plant growth. Thus, throughout the growing process, growers will surely bump into any one of these four factors:

On the other hand, excessive cold can also be a problem. It can turn the plant into a breeding ground for mold, fungus, and mildew. And, when there is not enough heat, plants are unable to photosynthesize. As a result, they are unable to produce enough nutrients for roots to absorb. From here on end, the plant may either stop growing or die.

Cannabis Will Flower Just About Anywhere with The Right Conditions

While not all may agree, starting small is still a smart choice especially for a home hobbyist. First, it is affordable. There is no need to purchase more than a dozen pack of seeds. Not only that, it is also less expensive to set up.

Humidity

Temperature is everything. It is the one factor that growers must never ignore. Why? Because a slight change in the temperature can make or break the growth of a plant.

How to grow a single marijuana plant indoors

Both medical and recreational dispensaries now sell female cannabis clones, which retail for about $15. Alternatively, it’s commonplace for home growers to gift clones to their friends. “When you get a clone, someone will likely give it to you in a four-inch pot. You’re skipping that whole step of having to germinate seeds. You’re already 10, 14 days ahead of the game and basically ready to plant.”

Even with a healthy clone, however, cultivating cannabis can be a long and arduous process — especially in tight indoor spaces. “A lot of people think growing is easy, but it’s not,” Lipton said. “You have to be really on it. Not everyone has success, obviously.”

Before someone even begins to consider the genetics of their preferred strain, they should first ensure that their apartment is cannabis-friendly. There are five main factors to consider: space, temperature, humidity, the pH of water, and the amount of light.

Plant and maintain the vegetative cycle until the plant is mature.

Sticking to that schedule is key, he added. “Say you’re at day 30 of the flowering cycle and you come into that closet when it’s supposed to be dark and turn a bunch of lights on. You’re going to throw the whole cycle off and that’s the end of that. It only takes 10 seconds.”

After 55 to 60 days, growers begin paying close attention to their plants’ trichomes — the small, bulbous fibers that develop around the flower of the female plant. “Those trichomes will turn from clear to amber,” Lipton said. “They kind of look like red hairs. You know it’s time to harvest when about 10 to 15 percent of the trichomes turn that color.” On average, cannabis plants have a five- to seven-day window of peak harvest time.

Know the law.

Light: 2,200k. “For a closet set up, I would recommend a 175-watt HPS light,” Lipton said. “Some people try to use fluorescent lighting, but I wouldn’t recommend that. You’re just not going to get a very good outcome. Nowadays, HPS lights can just go right into your home outlet, and you’d just need a timer [to set the intervals]. Position the light directly overhead. They can be pretty powerful, so you’re going to want it at least two feet from the top of the canopy [to prevent the plant from overheating].”

“Growing cannabis in tight spaces is not my usual recommendation,” said Stephen Lipton, the cultivation manager at The Farm Recreational Marijuana Dispensary, an award-winning recreational facility in Boulder, Colorado, specializing in what it calls “craft cannabis.” At any given time, Lipton oversees close to 15,000 plants across seven different facilities in Boulder County. “If you have a really tight space and it gets too hot or too humid, you’re going to have big trouble.”