Posted on

how to grow an autoflowering weed plant

How to grow an autoflowering weed plant

After all, a plant that gives you lip-smacking buds in just 2 months deserves some research, eh? Autoflowers may scare you at first, but if you avoid a few common mistakes, you’ll harvest much more than you can imagine, and it only gets better.

2. Time it right

If the pH drops below 6, the roots will not be able to intake vital nutrients such as magnesium, calcium, and phosphorous. Similarly, if the pH is too alkaline and goes above 7.5, the roots cannot take up micronutrients like copper, manganese, boron, etc. It’s very important to regulate the pH at all times to prevent nutrient deficiencies.

8. Overfeeding and underfeeding

For beginners, germinating the seeds is an important part of the entire process. To get better results, soak the seeds in plain water for at least 24 hours and wrap them in moist paper towels for a day or two. Use a ziplock bag to store the towels.

How to grow an autoflowering weed plant

By living such a short life, Ruderalis cannabis plants were able to survive in Russia with short summers and extremely long winters. Unfortunately, just like other types of wild hemp, wild Ruderalis buds contain very low levels of THC. Wild Ruderalis plants were also very small and produced tiny amounts of bud, which might make them seem useless to cannabis growers.

Fortunately, a forward-thinking breeder realized that the auto-flowering capability and short growing period of Ruderalis strains might be useful to hobbyist cannabis growers, even though the wild Ruderalis plant wasn’t going to work all by itself. This unknown breeder started intermingling Ruderalis plants with famous strains of photoperiod (regular) cannabis in order to increase bud potency while carefully breeding plants to retain the auto-flowering capability.

Auto-Flowering vs Photoperiod: Which Yields More?