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when to start growing weed outdoors

There are a number of changes to consider once plants go from the vegetative stage to the flowering stage:

Generally speaking, it takes anywhere from 10-32 weeks, or about 3-8 months, to grow a weed plant from seed. It’ll be quicker if you start with a clone or an autoflower seed.

As the sun reaches up high in the sky, your cannabis will want to as well. Make sure all of your plants are outside by the Summer Solstice.

If you buy a clone from a grower or breeder it will be a seedling, so you can skip the seed germination phase.

Flowering stage

Two rounded cotyledon leaves will grow out from the stem as the plant unfolds from the protective casing of the seed. These initial leaves are responsible for taking in sunlight needed for the plant to become healthy and stable.

Take meticulous notes on when and how you perform each step, as well as what the weather is like. Other notes can include how much water you give plants, at what intervals, and how much nutrients you give them. Pictures will also give you a better sense of how your plants look along the way.

Everything should be cleaned up, dried, and curing well before the Winter Solstice. Now’s a good time to make your own cannabutter, topicals, or tinctures with all that trim from the harvest. Kick your feet up, relax, and hunker down for the cold, it’s been a long growing season!

How long does it take to grow a marijuana plant?

Within the flowering stage, there are three subphases:

Cannabis plants are considered seedlings until they begin to develop leaves with the full number of blades on new fan leaves. A healthy seedling should be a vibrant green color.

When to start growing weed outdoors

Grow with the Sun

How to Grow Cannabis Outside

Our complete grow kits include everything you need to go from seed to your very own supply of high grade medical cannabis.

State by State Guide to Growing Cannabis Outside

States that are higher altitude and/or have colder winters, such as Colorado, Montana, the Midwest, and the Northeast, also benefit from the shorter growing season of autoflowering plants. The best time to plant might not be until April or May, and that’s okay; the plants will still be ready to harvest before the weather starts getting too cold. In general, it should be safe to bring your plants outside by the time the end of April rolls around. This applies to the majority of states in the North, although you might want to bring them indoors at night when the risk of nighttime frost still exists.

Soil has three basic consistencies, in various ratios:

In general, 5-gallon pots are a good size for small-to-medium outdoor plants, and 10-gallon pots or larger are recommended for big plants. Regardless of size, you’ll want to protect the roots of your plants from overheating during warm weather, as pots can quickly get hot in direct sunlight. This will severely limit the growth of your plants, so be sure to shade your containers when the sun is high in the sky.

Relying on the power of the sun, you won’t need to spend a ton of money on an outdoor grow. You’ll need some soil, fertilizer, seeds or clones, and maybe a small greenhouse to get them started. You won’t need to pay for electricity for lights, AC units, or dehumidifiers, and you can even collect rainwater.

Soil and other media for outdoor cannabis growing

For most first-time gardeners, we recommend buying a quality potting soil that will provide your plants with enough nutrients to get them through most of their growth cycle without having to add many amendments. This pre-fertilized soil—often referred to as “super-soil”—that can grow cannabis plants from start to finish without any added nutrients if used correctly.

The best way to identify loamy soil is by touching it. How does it feel? Sandy soil should be difficult to compact while clay should compact into a tight ball that won’t crumble. When squeezed, loamy soils should form a loose ball that will hold its structure momentarily before breaking apart in large chunks.

Buying the right soil for an outdoor cannabis grow

You also want to consider privacy and security. A lot of people want to conceal their gardens from judgmental neighbors and potential thieves. Tall fences and large shrubs or trees are your best bet, unless you live in a secluded area. Also, most state laws require that you keep cannabis plants concealed from the street.

Once you have an understanding of the climate in your area, you’ll need to consider a few things before planting your weed.