Posted on

x-files seeds

You’ve probably never seen anything like this apple-sunflower seed relish. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. Sometimes you just have to believe.

Mulder didn’t even have a bed (one of his many charming quirks), so he probably didn’t have a pressure cooker. But if he did, he could have made this quick and creamy risotto.

This sweet and crunchy brittle is incredible with cheese—or, if you’re Mulder or Scully, with a diet soda while sitting in a hotel bed alone watching old black-and-white monster movies waiting for someone else to die.

We wanted to believe, and now it might become a reality. Fox Television Group Chairman Gary Newman recently confirmed that the network is in talks to bring back The X-Files with its original dream team: David Duchovny, Gillian Anderson and series creator Chris Carter. While nothing is confirmed, we’re already getting pumped by rebooting our Lone Gunmen fanfic, digging out our Flukeman figurine and eating lots of Mulder’s favorite snack—sunflower seeds.

4. Sunchoke Salad with Apple-Sunflower Seed Relish and Olive Puree

The perfect snack for a stakeout in front of a potential alien-human hybrid’s residence.

Here, five sunflower seed recipes to help you pass the time waiting for the next big X-Files announcement.

After a long day at work or a long night hunting a gargoyle-esque creature in a warehouse, nothing satisfies like super-chunky, sunflower-and-pumpkin-seed-studded dark chocolate.

2. Sunflower-Seed Brittle

Carter
I got this letter from a viewer, Terry Berube, who said, ”People like the episodes best that explore Mulder and Scully’s relationship and invest in their belief systems.” She was absolutely right. I named a character after her in the season 1 finale. The philosophy she articulated informed our approach going forward, especially as we moved into the conspiracy story line.

Update: The X-Files TEAM
David Duchovny
The 53-year-old’s signature success after The X-Files has been playing womanizing writer Hank Moody on the long-running Showtime series Californication, which earned him a Golden Globe in 2008.

”The truth is out there.” So promised The X-Files, the groundbreaking sci-fi saga that debuted 20 years ago this fall. But the maxim that appears in the show’s credits — the mantra of questing FBI agents Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) and Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) — was supposed to be something else. Creator Chris Carter forgets the original phrase, but he remembers that it wasn’t good. With time running out, and Carter hating the entire credits sequence in general, the producer began brainstorming ideas for images (germinating seeds, a man’s morphing face) and words. Out came The truth is out there. ”And everyone liked it,” says Carter. ”That’s simply the story.”

”THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.”
So promised The X-Files, the groundbreaking sci-fi saga that debuted 20 years ago this fall. But the maxim that appears in the show’s credits — the mantra of questing FBI agents Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) and Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) — was supposed to be something else. Creator Chris Carter forgets the original phrase, but he remembers that it wasn’t good. With time running out, and Carter hating the entire credits sequence in general, the producer began brainstorming ideas for images (germinating seeds, a man’s morphing face) and words. Out came The truth is out there. ”And everyone liked it,” says Carter. ”That’s simply the story.”
In fact, that’s the simple summary of The X-Files‘ remarkable creative evolution. One of the most influential stories of the past two decades — a progenitor of our geek-pop moment and fan culture; the model for any show with conspiracy, mythology, and monsters of the week — was a product of inspiration and improvisation, happy accidents and discovery. Oh, and a pregnancy. Here on the 20th anniversary, we asked Carter, Anderson, and Duchovny to reflect on the early years and how The X-Files found its truth.

A Leap of Faith
Chris Carter was a 34-year-old journeyman television writer when he got the chance to pitch a dream project. He credits Peter Roth, then president of Fox Television, for believing in his talent, and two unproven actors who embodied his visionand had no interest in TV.

Anderson
That was an important episode for me. In early episodes Scully had to be confident enough to address a room of male FBI agents and tell them what to do. I remember thinking, ”I’m not sure if I have the balls to pretend that I have the same balls as her.” With ”Beyond the Sea,” which was a quote-unquote Scully episode, I recognized that this was an opportunity for me. I sat down with the director, David Nutter, and worked out the performance beat for beat. That they had confidence in me to give me that material bolstered my confidence.

In fact, that?s the simple summary of The X-Files‘ remarkable creative evolution. One of the most influential stories of the past two decades — a progenitor of our geek-pop moment and fan culture; the model for any show with conspiracy, mythology, and monsters of the week — was a product of inspiration and improvisation, happy accidents and discovery. Oh, and a pregnancy. Here on the 20th anniversary, we asked Carter, Anderson, and Duchovny to reflect on the early years and how The X-Files found its truth.